Thanksgiving in Italy

So, here we were, beginning to feel quite at home in Italy and preparing to celebrate our first American holiday here. As I awoke two days prior, I gasped with excitement to see the surprise Monte Stella had in store for us – She was adorned with a light, glistening frosting of snow!! Snow is extremely rare in Southern Italy and rarely ever happens, but we were lucky enough to witness this rare event.

Monte Stella stands at a majestic 3,711 feet above sea level right by the sea, so this just further emphasizes her stature! There is truly no way to capture her majesty with a lens. You must be physically present to take in the full effect, which in case you haven’t gathered by now, I would be more than ready and willing to do 24/365, except for the wonderful family (including adorable little grandchildren) and great friends we have in the US. In Italy, I always rise early every morning and practically run to the window and balcony to check out the view. This often leads to yet another photo shoot of the coastline and Monte Stella, because it’s never the same picture twice. Yes, God is the most amazing artist! And in Casalvelino, He has big sky, huge Monte Stella and the sea to work with, all at once . . . in my opinion, it doesn’t get better!

Before we knew it, it was Thanksgiving and we awoke to find quite a different view. The atmosphere had become a bit unstable, perhaps due to the cold air that caused the snow to fall on Monte Stella. Our weather app told us to expect a stormy day for Thanksgiving, and the skies certainly supported that forecast, so we hurried out to the shops before afternoon siesta set in to grab everything we would need for our Cilentano-style Thanksgiving Feast.

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So, off to the pescheria (fish store), pasticceria (pastry shop) and frutta e verdure (fruit and vegetables) to gather everything needed for our feast.

Then to go home and enjoy preparing our “catch”. The tiny clams were simply dilizioso! Everything had such a fresh taste and smell, unlike the watery tasting fruit we often are stuck buying back in the states, unless you are lucky enough to be located close to a produce source so you can buy fresh directly.

The day was filled with back to back thunderstorms and we enjoyed watched the spectacular cloud formations over the sea and around Monte Stella from our hilltop perch across the valley.

After about twelve back to back dramatic storms, clearing seemed to be coming from the sea. Red sky at night, sailors delight!

Ciao!

Giovanna

 

 

 

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4 thoughts on “Thanksgiving in Italy

  1. I know exactly how you feel getting up and looking out the window! One year in Reggio Calabria, I had an apartment on the 6th floor overlooking the Strait of Messina. The first thing I did in the morning was open the shutters to see if Etna was cloud free – and when there was snow – spettacolare!
    It’s interesting experiencing an American holiday in a foreign country. I’m in Calabria at the moment and an American friend had a Thanksgiving gathering last night that began at 9:30 pm, normal for Italians, strange for a classic American dinner. He couldn’t get a turkey – something about not the right time of year. Anyway, we had an extremely large chicken. Also, couldn’t get sweet potatoes, so mixed white potatoes and carrots. A German brought the pumpkin pie, which was excellent. A fun night.
    I’m rambling, but here’s a link to a Thanksgiving post on my site: http://www.calabriatheotheritaly.com/an-american-thanksgiving-in-italy/

    Liked by 1 person

  2. You are right, it is very different being another country for a American holiday. I smiled when reading about your 9:30 pm dinner – my husband and I are often the first people at a restaurant when it opens for dinner! We really have to get on “Italian time”!! I will checkout your site!

    Like

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